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turbulence here in washington tonight. >> as the faa began furloughing air traffic controllers and the flight delays began. the finger pointing quickly followed. >> as a result of administration's poor planning, i would argue political motives, thousands of people were stuck on tarmacs over the last few days. >> congress had an opportunity but republicans made a choice. and this is a result of a choice they made to embrace the sequester as, and i'm quoting republicans, as a victory for the tea party and a home run. >> if the blame was partisan, the pain was not. long lines and missed connections raised bipartisan concerns with republican and democratic senators asking the transportation secretary and head of the faa how much funding do you need to avoid furloughing air traffic controllers and to keep the contract air traffic control towers open and what could you cut from other accounts to avoid or reduced air traffic controller furloughs and contract closures and there were bipartisan proposed solutions. >> what i believe is there ought to be postponement of these furloughs to give all of us
as the national transportation safety board takes a closer look at one fire in particular just days after the faa approved boeing's plan to get its fleet back in the air. dan springer is live in seattle. dan? >> reporter: yeah, jon. the faa approved the battery fix even as the company answers tough questions about the fire back in january that led to the dreamliner fleet getting grounded. the plane's lithium ion battery sured a short which led to the failure of all eight cells. boeing's new plan includes a redesigned battery that has more insulation between the cells to prevent what's called thermal runaway. the battery charger has been redesigned to reduce the total amount of energy in the battery so it doesn't work as hard, and it's going to be in a better steel containment box that won't allow oxygen to fuel a fire. the ntsb put boeing on the defensive this morning about its assumptions that turned out to be wrong. >> what we can't do is we can't account for every single possible method of short circuit, particularly what we would consider the unknown unknowns. >> reporter: boeing says it has
at the airport. the f.a.a. imposing furloughs on thousands of employees. those cuts are being blamed on sequester. guess what? delays, delays, delays. >>steve: with fewer workers responsible for the same number of planes that means you're going to have to wait. here now stuart varney, we're not going to make him wait. the scare quester didn't work. now what they're trying to do is inflict pain. people are going to sit on planes, they're going to call their congressmen. "you've got to do something about it! " >> that's right. quick pop quiz. did you know the f.a.a., the people who run the air traffic system, this year they will spend $500 million on consultants, $325 million on supplies and travel, $474 million on grants to make communities more livable and sustainable. >>steve: are you saying there's money available where they don't have to furlough those guys? >> exactly. why don't you take some of that money and put it into the air traffic controllers' bucket so we don't have to have these delays? because the president says we don't have the flexibility. we cannot redirect spending. not allowed
? >> possible options for travelers now that it is day three of the faa furloughs longer airport wait time, longer tarmac wait time perhaps canceled flights all together. now they have filed a motion to place a moratorium on the rule saying airlines cannot let passengers remain on the tarmac for more than 3 hours. the motion notes 6700 flights will be delayed daily at 13 of the busiest airports now that the furloughs have started f. you add bad weather on ton of that it could get pretty ugly. if the tarmac rule does stay in place airlines may be forced to cancel flights and significantly disrupt travel plans. because they don't have the appropriate staff to go deal with the travel disruption. >> they are telling passengers there's always the bus. >> college, is it worth it or not worth it? >> there is a growing number of people saying it's not worth it. no longer guarantees success. even a good enough job where you make enough money to pay back your student loan. the average college grad is graduating with 28,000 in debt. that's why some high school grads are starting their own businesses
a question whether they will come in. you have a 3 1/2 mile faa advisesy over the city of watertown. no taxis are allowed to pick up anybody in boston the governor is asking everyone shelter in place obviously. the mbta which is our transit is not traveling anywhere. so right now everything is in lockdown. i'll tell you what, people get it. they understand what is at stake here. they understand that everybody throughout the world is watching and we need to give our law enforcement personnel the tools and the ability their jobs and do it well without worrying about any civilian casualties being part of this whole situation. jon: and they have done that job well. i mean, you know, from the minute the fbi released the photographs, i mean the responses to these various criminal events that took place in and around cambridge, boston, watertown, were met with an overwhelming response. >> yeah. jon: you've got all kinds of police aunl sis there up to and including the national guard. >> as a member of the national ard i'm keenly aware what their role is and their role is certainly to make sure that
, and what we think is the right solution is the faa, the government agency, they need to learn with those bodies. they need to learn to understand exactly what's being done in the different industries to deal with different threats. and that's how we're going to develop our own best practice. >> host: gautham nagesh. >> greg, you mentioned that thebacking industry is largely ahead of the curve when it comes to these sorts of things, likely due to the nature of the business itself, and like you said, the criminals are often looking for money. how would you say the broader employees of your industry, how successful would your education efforts be, would you say, and have there been any keys that could be applied to other critical infrastructure sectors? >> guest: i think the, you know, by and large, employees within the financial institutions, um, are fairly well aware of what's going on, and, you know, given over the last year increasing news about attacks on the financial system, the awareness has only grown. as part of every bank's standard procedures, employees are tested. they're train
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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